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Jason Osei, a native Londoner, left the UK to play American Football in Europe before moving to America in 2012. With four conference championships under his belt, twice voted all-conference player and graduating from university with honours, Jason has clearly struck a winning formula.

The secret to his success isn’t particularly secret however. Jason shy’s away from any suggestions of being especially gifted in any particular way that makes his success any less attainable for the average individual.

“From grit to greatness…” a statement Jason proclaimed in a 2017 ad campaign by Texas A&M Commerce University, where his image was featured on Dallas-area billboards, television ads, online and at the local airport.

Success often requires a combination of patience, effort and self-discipline. These are attributes which must be nurtured and developed to create an environment under an optimum outcome is most likely achieved on a consistent basis.

It takes work and hard graft which sometimes goes immediately unrewarded, but serves as a foundation to build upon.

His days as a collegiate American Football player are over, but Jason isn’t slowing down. He is undefeated as an MMA fighter and is currently a championship winning semi-pro tag-team wrestler going under the moniker, ‘The Summit‘.

The summit is an apt metaphor for the journey to success. It’s arduous and uphill all the way, but with every step you take forward, you’re one step closer to your goal. The process shapes you in immeasurably valuable ways; it shows you the weaknesses that hold you back and each new victory serves as motivation to keep moving forward.

If you like the podcast and want to give us some feedback, or if you want to be featured on the show, please use the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

In the meantime, click the link above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.

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This is the final episode of a 3-part series titled, ‘Paternal’. It is honest, funny and heartfelt. If you haven’t listened to the previous episodes, then I’d recommend you click the links below to do so now:

  1. In the Beginning
  2. The Beginning of the End

Last year I wrote a blog post titled Am I Enough… It was my attempt to articulate more than 20 years of hurt and anger for what I perceived as my father’s unwillingness to fight hard enough to keep me in his life.

Maybe it’s unfair to have placed all of that at his feet. Maybe in some situations, regardless of best efforts or honest intentions, collateral damage is just an unavoidable consequence of relationship breakdowns. Maybe there are innumerable shades of grey that I had never been able to consider before.

Whatever the reality of the situation, it was my commitment to breaking the cycle. And I think the conversation you’re about to hear is our commitment to each other. A commitment to be better men.

On this episode, my father and I talk about the impact of our family’s breakdown and our struggles in forging our own identities in manhood.

If you like the podcast and want to give us some feedback, or if you want to be featured on the show, please use the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

In the meantime, click the link above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.

NEW EPIOSODE OUT NOW: Paternal - The Beginning of the End.

This is the second episode of a 3-part series titled, ‘Paternal’. It is honest, funny and heartfelt. If you haven’t listened to part 1, In the Beginning, then I’d recommend you click the link to do so now.

When I was 9 years old, I had a teacher called Miss Bryant. In class one day, she noticed I had become withdrawn and subdued. She took me aside to ask what was wrong and after some prodding, I explained that things at home between my parents weren’t great. It wasn’t long afterwards that I moved to a different school, largely owing to the financial pressures under which my newly single mom now found herself.

A couple years later and entirely by chance, mine and Miss Bryant’s paths crossed again. We talked for a little while, and she asked whether things had improved at home. It was difficult to find an answer. I mean, things were certainly different; my father was no longer living with us and the volatility of my parents’ relationship had now moved into a space far less accessible to me. But I couldn’t honestly say things had improved. We just had different challenges now.

For me, chief among them was trying to help mom pick up the pieces of our broken home.

On this episode, my father and I talk about the circumstances that led to the breakdown of our family and our father-son relationship.

If you like the podcast and want to give us some feedback, or if you want to be featured on the show, please use the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

In the meantime, click the link above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.

Listen on Apple Podcasts

My parents split up when I was about 10 years old. The last eighteen months of their relationship was, as I perceived it, a traumatic, disruptive and chaotic mess.

In the years that followed, my relationship with my father broke down. There were many reasons for this, but it mainly boiled down to the fact that I didn’t feel emotionally secure in the situation to continue loving him as I did before, and I didn’t feel like he put enough effort into providing that security for me.

On this episode, my father and I have a direct, real-time conversation with each other for the first time in over 20 years.

We talk about his childhood, the abuse he suffered at home and the circumstances under which I came into this world. This is the first episode of a 3-part series titled Paternal. It is honest, funny and heartfelt.  

If you like the podcast and want to give us some feedback, or if you want to be featured on the show, please use the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

In the meantime, click the link above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.

We are relational human beings, and as such we often encounter conflict in our relationships. Conflict is normal, its common, but it’s not necessarily a harbinger of doom.

Conflict within positive relationships between men can instil respect of each others’ differences and jovial provocation. But sometimes, conflict can result in the breakdown of relationships or lead to serious difficulties and sustained interactions.

In this episode, I talk with Chukwudi, Daniel, Raymond and Spregs about our experiences of being in conflict with other men and with each other.

If you like the podcast and want to give us some feedback, or if you want to be featured on the show, please use the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

In the meantime, click the link above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.

DISCLAIMER: One of the guests uses the ‘n-word’ to describe incidents of racism he’s faced.