We are relational human beings, and as such we often encounter conflict in our relationships. Conflict is normal, its common, but it’s not necessarily a harbinger of doom.

Conflict within positive relationships between men can instil respect of each others’ differences and jovial provocation. But sometimes, conflict can result in the breakdown of relationships or lead to serious difficulties and sustained interactions.

In this episode, I talk with Chukwudi, Daniel, Raymond and Spregs about our experiences of being in conflict with other men and with each other.

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In the meantime, click the link above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.

DISCLAIMER: One of the guests uses the ‘n-word’ to describe incidents of racism he’s faced.

We live in an age where there is certainly a recognition that men and women are entitled to equal opportunities, and rightfully so. But despite the shift towards more women becoming leaders in the workplace and other areas of life, men still feel under a lot of pressure to be financially successful. How do we resolve the internal conflict between the intrinsic need to be capable providers and the reality that our value as men doesn’t need to be centred on our ability to accumulate resources?

How transparent should we be with our partners about money, and how do we share the responsibilities for managing finances within our relationships?

This episode features a new addition to the Man Ting podcast, Chukwudi Ugbomah.

Chukwudi is a teacher in a secondary school, a musician and he’s currently engaged to be married. In this episode, we talk about the complex minefield that is dating for marriage, knowing when you’ve found ‘the one’, and resolving conflicts within our relationships when they arise.

Both myself and Chukwudi are massive sports fans, and in the week where Kobe Bryant was killed in a helicopter crash along with his 13 year old daughter and 7 other victims, it was impossible not to talk about his legacy as a supreme athlete on the court, and a doting dad off it. We explore what the concept of legacy means for us, and how we as men create something of value for those who come after to emulate and surpass.

Rest in Peace:
Kobe Bryan, age 41
Gianna Bryant, age 13
John Altobelli, age 56
Kerri Altobelli, age 46
Alyssa Altobelli, age 13
Sarah Payton, age 45
Payton Chester, age 13
Christina Mauser, age 38
Ara Zobayan, age 50

If you like the podcast and want to give us some feedback, or if you want to be featured on the show, please use the contact form in the ‘About’ section.

In the meantime, click the button above to start the episode now and thank you for listening.